Sunday, May 20, 2012

Peppers (two ways)

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I am working towards an exhibition in the very near future, but still can’t help myself from leaving the main work and experimenting.

I tried these peppers first with pastels (above) and then with Promarker markers, which I bought ages ago but haven’t really tried. I had trouble with them bleeding on paper and didn’t realise you could get special paper for markers, until I saw it online and got some. Any way , here is my effort, which I hope I can improve on…anyone out there using markers, I would welcome some tips.

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I made a disaster of the green one, I found they all improved a bit when I outlined them with a black liner pen, the shadow is another disaster but is all a learning curve.

15 comments:

  1. The bold colors on your work with markers are very effective, very eye catching. I'm glad you found some paper that works for you.

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  2. No disaster here as far as I can see. I like both pictures. I often find that adding black line enhances what I am doing in watercolor and it frankly pisses me off! That is why I am working so darned hard at trying to make it work without those ink lines. So I can relate.

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    1. I know the feeling Dan, I just gave in!!!!

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  3. Experimenting is essential, Phil. When we do this we open up new ways of seeing. Your examples are a good illustration of decision making and I would favour the bolder markers as they do justice to the shiny surfaces of the peppers.
    Next time try a different colour instead of black for outlines and see what you come up with.

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    1. I like the ink outline - makes the picture more interesting IMHO.

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  4. Both are very good, but I find myself drawn to the more saturated colors of the markers. They do seems to work better for the texture of peppers.

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  5. It might just be that the red and yellow are so good looking. When working with markers limit the open spaces large areas tend to show streaking much more easily. Also use circular motions and work within the wet. See how on the green there are lines. Practice within a circle start at one side and work out never go to far from your moistened lines keep working them gently without scrubbing. Markers are fun and the brilliant colors are intoxicating. Keep using them and you will fall in love.

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  6. I love the one made with the markers. Love the neatness of the lines and colors. I have no idea how to work with markers but you make me want to learn!

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  7. Thanks for sharing your experiment with us!I don't like eating peppers, but these are look so tasty!:) I've never used markers, but looking at you sketches I think that I'm probably missing something :)

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  8. I think you did a nice job on those marker peppers - My favorite part of the marker drawing is how the black pen and the red pepper aren't exact - and the colors are bold.

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  9. In my opinion (that is my disclaimer :) ) what works with the pastel drawing is that the edge of the forms are suggested by the tone of the colors (the pastel strokes). This give a loose, natural effect in your drawing. In the marker drawing, the black line overpowers and tightens the image by isolating the peppers from one another. I would suggest rather than fully outlining the forms, try using just enough line to accent the shapes and forms. In other words, try not fully enclosing shapes with outlines. Also, experiment with using a different color other than black. Though black can be effective for defining forms, sometimes it can overpower the drawing, as is often the challenge with markers. Check out the drawings of Degas or Toulouse Lautrec for good examples of linear accents.

    Good job with you drawings. Hope you can exhibit soon!

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    1. Thanks alot David, I looked again and you are of course right. Will try this out with my next one.

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